Brookshier's playing career ended because of a compound leg fracture, sustained while making a tackle on Willie Galimore in an Eagles' 16–14 victory over the Chicago Bears at Franklin Field on November 5, 1961. Now my own network is bailing out on me and taking me off the air. |  Looking for some great streaming picks?

As a lieutenant, he was a backfield coach at the United States Air Force Academy for one year in 1955.[5].

Tom Brookshier Family, Childhood, Life Achievements, Facts, Wiki and ... NFL broadcaster for CBS through the entire 1970s. A month earlier, CBS assigned Summerall and Brookshier to announce a Ken Norton bout against Pedro Lovell, a mere eight days before they called Super Bowl X. Sagittarius Football Player #48. At Roswell, he received all-state honors in football, basketball and baseball. [8] The two former NFL players became arguably American television's most popular sports broadcasting team for the remainder of the decade. Travel back in time to check out the early roles of some of Hollywood's heavy hitters. He and Summerall also appeared as themselves on film in Black Sunday, which was partially filmed at Super Bowl X. Brookshier and Summerall[10] called a heavyweight title fight between Muhammad Ali and Jean Pierre Coopman live in prime time on Friday, February 20, 1976. "[14] The apology was accepted by the university and university president Donald Swain invited Brookshier to be the featured speaker at the school's annual football kickoff luncheon in Clarksville, Indiana on August 2, 1984.

He was a starting defensive back for the Philadelphia Eagles for seven seasons, from 1953 to 1961.

He died on January 29, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Tom Brookshier was born on December 16, 1931 in Roswell, New Mexico, USA as Thomas Jefferson Brookshier. of about 40, but they can play basketball." Tom Brookshier Popularity . The team retired his No. In 1981, Brookshier switched to calling play-by-play for the network, with John Madden taking his place[11] as color commentator alongside Summerall. Tom Brookshier, a star defensive back who helped lead the Philadelphia Eagles to the 1960 National Football League championship and later teamed with Pat … 1977 Blackout, The Complete History of the Philadelphia Eagles, The Game of Their Lives: Pro Football's Wonder Years, St. Louis Cardinals vs. New Orleans Saints, Daughters of the Sexual Revolution: The Untold Story of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders. Brent Musburger and Phyllis George of The NFL Today co-hosted the telecast that night. Thomas Jefferson "Tom" Brookshier (December 16, 1931 – January 29, 2010) was an American professional football player, coach and sportscaster. He had three children, Betsy, Linda and Thomas Jr., with his wife Barbara Brookshier.

Brookshier became the subject of controversy in 1983 because of a remark he made during an NFL broadcast of an Eagles–Saints game on December 11.

Tom Brookshier was born in New Mexico on December 16, 1931.He was drafted 117th overall by the Eagles in 1953 after playing college football at the University of Colorado. He was an actor, known for Black Sunday (1977), The NFL on CBS (1956) and This Week in Pro Football (1967). He was an actor, known for, Self - Color Commentator / Self - Color Commentator(Philadelphia) / Self - Play-by-Play Announcer / Self - Philadelphia Eagles Cornerback / Self - Color Commentator)Philadelphia), NFL Pro and CBS Broadcaster Tom Brookshier Dead at 78. Tom Brookshier was born on December 16, 1931 in Roswell, New Mexico, USA as Thomas Jefferson Brookshier. [1] One of his gridiron teammates was astronaut Jack Swigert, who was on the crew of the ill-fated Apollo 13. Our No.

He graduated from University of Colorado and joined the Philadelphia Eagles.

|  Describing the pair's on-air rapport, Summerall said, "With Brookie, it was more of a conversation, like two guys in a saloon. [6] He joined CBS in 1965 as a color commentator for Eagles telecasts, and continued to call regional action after the network moved away from dedicated team announcers in 1968. He was married to Barbara Brookshier. Official Sites, Graduated from the University of Colorado. Given a chance to walk back the statement by partner Charlie Waters, Brookshier doubled down, saying "it's the truth."[12]. In 1989, he hosted the morning show of the then-nascent 610 WIP sports format; the program was called Breakfast with Brookshier, before he was paired with Angelo Cataldi and the program re-dubbed Brookie and the Rookie, and then finally simply Brookshier and Cataldi. He played seven seasons for the Eagles and intercepted 20 passes. Most Popular #55669. He later paired with Pat Summerall on the primary broadcast team for National Football League (NFL) games on CBS during the 1970s. He is survived by his wife, Barbara Brookshier; daughters, Betsy Brookshier and Linda Brookshier; a son, Thomas Brookshier Jr.; and a granddaughter. After 20 years at CBS, I deserve better than this. Brookshier attended high school at Roswell High School in his hometown of Roswell, New Mexico. Brookshier's number was 40. Biography. Tom Brookshier was born on December 16, 1931 in Roswell, New Mexico, USA as Thomas Jefferson Brookshier. Brookshier began sportscasting for WCAU-AM-FM-TV in Philadelphia in 1962, and became the station's sports director the following year. Brookshier later apologized, calling his remark "stupid" and "dumb", but was angered over CBS's reaction, saying "I'm not about to be judged on one comment." In the early 1970s, Brookshier and Summerall co-hosted This Week in Pro Football, a weekly syndicated highlights show produced by NFL Films. He was married to Barbara Brookshier.

[13] Louisville's athletic director, Bill Olsen, felt that the remark was racist, since Louisville's starting five were all African American. He had three children, Betsy, Linda and Thomas Jr., with his wife Barbara Brookshier.

He played defensive back for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League from 1953 to 1961, missing both the 1954 and 1955 seasons to serve in the United States Air Force. 1 draft choice came down field on a pass pattern, and I knocked him out. He was an actor, known for Black Sunday (1977), The NFL on CBS (1956) and This Week in Pro Football (1967).

He died on January 29, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Thomas Jefferson "Tom" Brookshier (December 16, 1931 – January 29, 2010) was an American professional football player, coach and sportscaster. As a three-year letterman in football at the University of Colorado from 1950 through 1952, he was a defensive back, fullback and return specialist. "[9] Besides many regular-season and playoff contests, most of which involved the Dallas Cowboys who were the National Football Conference's most dominant franchise at the time, the duo called Super Bowls X, XII and XIV.

Tom Brookshier was born on December 16, 1931 in Roswell, New Mexico, USA as Thomas Jefferson Brookshier. Brookshier also worked pre- and post-game shows for four other Super Bowls. Tom Brookshier Wiki: Salary, Married, Wedding, Spouse, Family Thomas Jefferson "Tom" Brookshier (December 16, 1931 – January 29, 2010) was an American professional football player, coach and sportscaster. After a program note for an upcoming telecast of an NCAA men's basketball game between North Carolina State and Louisville, Brookshier said that the players on the Louisville team had "a collective I.Q.

He was a starting defensive back for the Philadelphia Eagles for seven seasons, from 1953 to 1961. [3][4] He was a member of the Eagles' Honor Roll and was one of only eight players whose numbers were retired by the team. Championship.

Brookshier died of cancer at Lankenau Hospital on January 29, 2010. Sagittarius Named Tom #13. He joined Pat Summerall for three Super Bowls and worked with John Madden in the 1981 season. 40.

Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist. He became a sports broadcaster in 1961 at WCAU in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was married to Barbara Brookshier.He died on January 29, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Plus, see what some of your favorite '90s stars look like now. [17] He left broadcasting and was last known to be working as a consultant for CB Richard Ellis, an international commercial real-estate firm.[18]. Tom Brookshier, Actor: Black Sunday.

Our coach jumped and yelled, and I thought 'Oh my God, I'm going to get cut!' Publicity Listings After CBS dismissed its main pro football voice Ray Scott in 1974,[7] the network went against its standard practice of using a professional announcer for play-by-play by promoting Summerall and partnering him with Brookshier. He was a starting defensive back for the Philadelphia … He previously three kids, Betsy, Linda and Thomas Jr., along with his wife Barbara Brookshier. What Were You Watching During the N.Y.C. He added, "I've done a lot of things for charity. This resulted in Neal Pilson, then president of CBS Sports, apologizing to Louisville school officials and later suspending Brookshier for the last weekend of the NFL regular season. [19] The Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia [1] inducted Brookshier into their Hall of Fame in 2007.

He was a 10th-round NFL draft pick.

', View agent, publicist, legal and company contact details on IMDbPro. Associated With. Complete Tom Brookshier 2017 Biography. [2] Brookshier was also a relief pitcher on the university's baseball team,[1] and played one season of minor league baseball in 1954 for the Roswell Rockets of the class-D Longhorn League. Other Works He was selected as an All-Pro and a Member of the Pro Bowl team in 1959 and 1960 when the Eagles defeated the Green Bay Packers for the N.F.L. Football Player Born in New Mexico #5. Which Thriller Would Make the Worst Name for a Retirement Home?

He later paired with Pat Summerall on the primary broadcast team for National Football League (NFL) games on CBS during the 1970s. He was a starter on the Eagles' NFL Championship team in 1960, and was selected for the Pro Bowl twice. [15][16] Brookshier was reinstated in CBS's announcing lineup for the 1984 season, continuing as a network commentator through 1987. Defensive back with the Philadelphia Eagles, 1953 & 1956-1961. He did play-by-play announcing for Super Bowl X, XII and XIV with fellow announcer Pat Summerall. He was an actor, known for Black Sunday (1977), The NFL on CBS (1956) and This Week in Pro Football (1967). Air Force Football, 2009, The Coaches p. 66, "Football, Broadcasting Legend Tom Brookshier Passes Away", "Chicago Bears at Philadelphia Eagles – November 5, 1961", "Ray Scott, 78, Voice of Packers During Glory Seasons in the 60's", "Tom Brookshier, Eagles Star and Broadcaster, Dies at 78", "Pat Summerall and Tom Brookshier calling boxing in 1976", "TV SPORTS; DILEMMA FOR CBS OVER LOUISVILLE GAME", "Tom Brookshier a huge part of my sports world growing up", "Tom Brookshier, broadcaster and Eagles great, dies", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tom_Brookshier&oldid=957279845, American television reporters and correspondents, Players of American football from New Mexico, NFL player missing current team parameter, Infobox NFL biography articles missing alt text and caption, Infobox NFL biography articles with old NFL.com URL, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Career statistics and player information from, This page was last edited on 18 May 2020, at 01:10.