Syllabus for Math 135, Spring 2017. It wasn't a homework problem, it was a midterm exam problem.

That twitter post was also separately linked to the rutgers subreddit and both a mod and the teacher, " Am I excited to catch these cheaters? The one I chose was "prove subtraction." I'm intrigued by this "impossible calc problem" (and the fake answer) but I can't find any links.

Contact your school or institution for an exact determination. Apparently the prof had the teaching assistant put answers to an impossible question on some homework answer board and 126 students had an identical answer to the midterm exam question that is fundamentally impossible to solve. I'm surprised more tests aren't using lockdown browsers and/or webcam proctored exams.

haha. I'd have to know the quality of the class before I condemn any side. Setting up a trap just to say "Hah, cheaters!!!" I don't disagree that college is about learning how to learn. It's weird how universities don't really teach more dynamically. So what happens to the students that didn’t cheat and their grades? Students are expected to be proficient in a set of skills and be able to demonstrate an understanding of them without using outside resources.

If I read this right, the professor had the TA "answer" the question on Chegg but sprinkle in some bad answers as well?

As usual, on any exam, you should read a question and only start to answer if you think you can at that moment.

is kinda fucked up lol.

Of course they will do whatever it takes to make sure their money is not wasted. I personally think that credential inflation is a problem and a lot of people go to college who might do better with another path.

Different expectations for different situations. All the calc classes I took just zoomed through material, That's nice for your class.

Professor constantly uses reddit and is quite active on the board. This ain't a game where you fuck competent students into another 6 month commitment and several thousands dollars more debt.

We didn't have to memorize all the theorems, we could bring the entire book with us. Don't expect to just show up to class, kinda listen and then do well.

If you blindly write it down without realizing it's wrong you're screwing yourself and obviously haven't learned much but that's another problem.

Do what you have to do to succeed is what I say. Start a new thread to share your experiences with like-minded people.

Like one test I always remember clearly was the final for boolean algebra. Partial credit was given. Maybe people turned to asking classmates for answers because the professor puts unsolvable questions on there.

One is of the 126 students caught cheating and the other is of the fake question and answer. ResetEra Games of the Decade Awards (2010-2019), https://www.reddit.com/r/rutgers/comments/g9f57x/126_of_us_are_caught/. Math 136 is designed specifically for students who want a second semester of calculus for their technical background, but who do not intend to take further courses in Calculus or Differential Equations. how are they going to hold down a job when their colleagues aren't gonna tolerate their shit.

What kind of shit head designs a question like that? Fuck that professor hard. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Like what the fuck? What I dont understand is, do they keep planning to cheat in the workforce? Tying education to profit just introduces so many problems. Perhaps if education was more affordable students could be more concerned with learning the material and less concerned with survival. The professor lacks integrity as well.

A relatively easier course. Do you realize how much more difficult it makes it for the kids who aren't cheating when people do cheat? So, naturally, we just memorized the test half hour before and did well. The purpose of college is to teach people how to learn well, not vocational training. Based on my experience nearly 20years ago, I was going to write that I understand it, thinking OP was talking about calc 2 (152) or 3 (251).

He got suspicious when the midterm marks were unusually high like 80s high. Cheating can be a morally grey area in some situations (yes, really) but lazy cheaters deserve no sympathy.

One is of the 126 students caught cheating and the other is of the fake question and answer.

This tool is intended to be used as a guide only. Some Economics majors may only need Math 135, but others may also need Math 152. I dont think what Krejlooc is saying contradicts your example because college shouldn't be vocational training, although certain majors feel like such.

Unless we actually knew how to attack the proof, having access to the theorems was useless. Reminds me of a Geography 101 course when I was in college. The fact that this was a trick question is the problem.

Math 135 is intended and required for many majors in the biological and social sciences.

Dr. G's the man. Students in Rutgers Business School are also currently required to pass Math 135 with a grade of C. If it's something already known don't do the work twice.

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EDIT: I might have gotten 2 separate incidents mixed together. Because that strikes me as a major dick move to begin with and I'm not surprised people resort to cheating when they are in an environment where they can easily do so and are faced with a question that just makes no sense to them. Exams are intended to help ensure a baseline level of competency, though. lmao what an ass.

There was a huge statewide cheating scandal in California last year with the pharmacy test, and my friend got impacted by it because they decided to just throw out all the tests that were given in that timeframe because they couldn't figure out how to tell who cheated and who didn't. Huh? Of course they will do whatever it takes to make sure their money is not wasted. I had to take a class on why cheating is bad and write a paper on why I made a mistake or whatever. I am sure the rest of them checked out the answer too but that they sniffed out the obvious bait.

is it cheating when in real life/real work everyone looks up the answers online? Let's try to think for a moment what the purpose of math homework at a university is: I got caught "cheating" in college. When I took calculus in college, it was advertised as "for those of you who never took a single calculus class in highschool", then on the very first day of class, as we were going over the basics of integration, the professor started going off about "think back to how your HS calc courses taught you to do this...".

Math 136 is the second semester of the Math 135-136 sequence for students studying Life Sciences or Social Sciences.

The ways you are tested and taught calculus in college is not at all like how you'd use it in real life. JavaScript is disabled. Of course you would. A … The professor uploaded an answer key to the test, which was then used?

They require you to show your desk and workspace, speak and identify yourself, etc so you can't cheat or use a resource. Why are some people trying to equate this with real life work?

We want to create an inspiring environment for our members and have defined a set of guidelines. Yes, it’s expected that you know how to google for solutions in the real world so that you don’t reinvent the wheel.

As in, take credit for someone else's work as your own? Over 100 students couldn't tell they were doing an impossible question? I wrote papers for people back in the day - it was great money.

Looking up an answer for homework isn't cheating, that's normal. They found it on chegg.

Here is the Reddit discussion where the prof chimed in.

If you have to put the work in by yourself, simple as that. Start a new thread to share your experiences with like-minded people. Really good professor, and a great guy.

126 used their phones during the midterm, or 126 memorized an incorrect answer? First rule of cheating: don't get caught.

So like, they could have cheated by referencing it, and then at least doing the minimum to check the answers themselves and weed out things things that were incorrect and gotten an actual good grade?

If it was unsolvable, and the students didn't think that that was a possibility, they'd have no choice but to go for the only answer or risk their grade falling.

From my own college courses, the ones where I learned the most were usually the ones where they allowed people to use whatever outside sources they wanted during the exams.

Of course if I'm paying a ridiculous amount of money for a probably pointless class, I would look up the answer rather than take a F for an impossible question over having to pay additional insane amount of money for failing. Otherwise you read the next question.

There's no point in trying. I'm not paying my college to have my professor and his/her dipshit assistant play mind games with me, Guaranteed they've already taken it up with the dean, sounds like the professor set it up for students to cheat?

so like, if you live with people and someone enters your room and you look at them, it's very likely it'll flag you as "potentially" cheating. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding.

Prerequisite: Placement into calculus, Rutgers Math 112 or Math 115, or equivalent..

Of course outside resources exist (and students are actually taught how to use them), but if you hired a graduate with a CS degree, would you expect them to be able to code FizzBuzz without digging into StackOverflow? JavaScript is disabled.

Rutgers University - New Brunswick - Grades and Records. No, this isn’t how a take home midterm is expected to be solved. Sadly, some people didn't think to miss a few so like 80% of the class aced two tests in a row. Start a new thread to share your experiences with like-minded people.

Nature of the Course. I guess the temptation to cheat is pretty high, especially given the resources today and cost of college. As a professor, you can't stop people doing online tests from cheating. I think it's garbage for a for-profit university to actively try to entrap students like that. But then I mention what expectations an employer might have for a CS graduate, and suddenly you say college isn't about vocational training? More than likely many of those kids just needed calc to satisfy some math requirement for their non-math-heavy degree and what they will wind up doing in life won't really involve much pen-and-paper calculus on a day to day basis.

Text: Calculus: Special Edition: Chapters 1-5 (6th edition) by Smith, Strauss, and Toda, published by Kendall Hunt, 2014; ISBN: 978-1-4652-2923-6. Your thesis is that "the ways you are tested and taught calculus in college is not at all like how you'd use it in real life," which you exemplify by discussing a scenario "in the work place." Even if in this case they fucked it, I don’t condemn it at all. Please note that all Bitlinks are public but anonymous; therefore, use at your discretion.

The teacher used the same test for multiple years in a row. So, he switched questions the next test and everyone failed. my response doesn't contradict that.

If it was unsolvable, and the students didn't think that that was a possibility, they'd have no choice but to go for the only answer or risk their grade falling. You're the one who mentioned "In the work place, you're rarely in situations where you have absolutely no outside help like you would on such an exam.". Integrity is important, but I'd say that they were set up to fail that integrity test.

but if you hired a graduate with a CS degree, would you expect them to be able to code FizzBuzz without digging into StackOverflow?