"Ozymandias" is one of the most famous poems of the Romantic era. This is continued with images of “courtly love”. What SAT Target Score Should You Be Aiming For? He reigned as pharaoh for 66 years, led the Egyptians to numerous military victories, built massive monuments and temples, and accumulated huge stores of wealth. However, instead of witnessing the powerful image of an omnipotent ruler, all that remains of Ozymandias's statue is a "Half sunk," broken image of a domineering man that is decaying in the sand.

The shift is found when the speaker moves from describing the physical aspects of the statue, which show that it is in pieces, to the significance of the statue, which is found on the pedestal.

In the poem, Shelley contrasts Ozymandias' boastful words of power in with the image of his ruined statue lying broken and forgotten in the sand. Irony is when tone or exaggeration is used to convey a meaning opposite to what's being literally said. The ironic theme that emerges in this poem shows how once a powerful king has much success and shows off his pride and later he has a major downfall a big wreck which is the major theme of the poem. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. He was a supporter of the French Revolution.

Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. Although the poem only discusses Ozymandias, it implies that all rulers, dynasties, and political regimes will eventually crumble as well, as nothing can withstand time forever. The inscription on the broken statue reads, Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'.

Universal Motif/Theme: The theme of the poem is pride is follwed by downfall. In Ozymandias, Shelley presents the ... Whilst Garland’s poem is presented in seven regular sestets (with a shift to italics to indicate a change of speaker), there is no overt rhyme scheme.

How Girls in Tech used Prezi Video to address social issues Dylan Thomas' "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night," is another extremely famous poem. The traveler attempts to explain the appearance of the pieces of stone and the impression created as to the attitude of the person portrayed by the now-broken statue.

The poem describes the half-buried remnants of a statue of Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II and contrasts the pharaoh's proud words with his ruined likeness.

The irony emerges from the juxtaposition of Ozymandias's inflated vision of his power and grandeur as ruler of a mighty kingdom and what survives of it today: a broken statue scattered on an empty desert.

All sonnets, including "Ozymandias" are fourteen lines long and written in iambic pentameter. The shift is found when the speaker moves from describing the physical aspects of the statue, which shows that it is in pieces, to the significance of the statue which is found on the pedestal.

The person speaking in the poem relates the comments of the "traveler," who describes the incredible remains s/he encountered, half visible and half buried, in the desert sand.