Thus most on'yomi are composed of two morae (beats), the second of which is either a lengthening of the vowel in the first mora (to ei, ō, or ū), the vowel i, or one of the syllables ku, ki, tsu, chi, fu (historically, later merged into ō and ū), or moraic n, chosen for their approximation to the final consonants of Middle Chinese.

Thus the two other writing systems, hiragana and katakana, referred to collectively as kana, are descended from kanji. If you are unable to add a bookmarklet in Mozilla Firefox according to the instructions above, there is another way; right click on a link and select Bookmark this link… Now you can drag this link from Bookmarks to the Bookmarks Toolbar. Place names sometimes also use nanori or, occasionally, unique readings not found elsewhere. The number of characters in circulation was reduced, and formal lists of characters to be learned during each grade of school were established. The third was given the task of bringing back the robe from the mythical fire-rat of China and the fourth had bring back a jewel studded collar from the neck of a dragon. Words whose kanji are jukujikun are often usually written as hiragana (if native), or katakana (if borrowed); some old borrowed words are also written as hiragana, especially Portuguese loanwords such as karuta (かるた) from Portuguese "carta" (Eng: card), tempura (てんぷら) from Portuguese "tempora", and pan (ぱん) from Spanish "pan" (Eng: bread), as well as tabako (たばこ).

Similar coinages occurred to a more limited extent in Korea and Vietnam. It is the other way around with yutō (kun-on). Katakana emerged via a parallel path: monastery students simplified man'yōgana to a single constituent element. Although he was married he had no children although he and his wife would dearly have loved one. This contrasts with on'yomi, which are monosyllabic, and is unusual in the Chinese family of scripts, which generally use one character per syllable—not only in Chinese, but also in Korean, Vietnamese, and Zhuang; polysyllabic Chinese characters are rare and considered non-standard. These are the Japanese form of hybrid words. Kanji (漢字, pronounced [kaɲdʑi] (listen)) are the adopted logographic Chinese characters that are used in the Japanese writing system. In other words, kokuji are not simply characters that were made in Japan, but characters that were first made in Japan. EUdict (European dictionary) is a collection of online dictionaries for the languages spoken mostly in Europe.

These are not considered kokuji but are instead called kok‌kun (国訓) and include characters such as the following: Han-dynasty scholar Xu Shen in his 2nd-century dictionary Shuowen Jiezi classified Chinese characters into six categories (Chinese: 六書 liùshū, Japanese: 六書 rikusho).

Okurigana can be used to indicate which kun'yomi to use, as in 食べる ta-beru versus 食う ku-u (casual), both meaning "(to) eat", but this is not always sufficient, as in 開く, which may be read as a-ku or hira-ku, both meaning "(to) open".