With more than 400 different models of aircraft in her logbook, she has flown everything from paragliders to Gulfstreams, so she writes about flying from real-world experience. The moving map allows pilots to check airspace limits at the touch of a button. The 760 is an ideal size for a yoke or kneeboard mount, and it comes with a cigarette-lighter adapter that works in airplanes with either 12- or 24-volt electrical systems. But I still miss the straight VTF magenta line that shows the extended centerline on the final approach course. It appears you have to use the AC charger to be effective. I have them both and definately prefer the 760, but change was uncomfortable at first. Garmin introduced today a new portable, and if you remember the good old days when a Garmin portable GPS unit was a revelation, then you know two other things—how far the company has come since then with such portable technology and how much less market there is for such devices with the advent of excellent all-in-one nav apps. I realized how much I liked the different features of the 760 when I went on a trip and forgot the mount for the 760. Plane and Pilot expands upon the vast base of knowledge and experience from aviation’s most reputable influencers to inspire, educate, entertain and inform. It’s similar in screen size, capability, and cost (about $1,500) to the aera 796. There’s fuel price info (which will pay for the price of the databases if not the unit itself), and much more. It charges via a USB C jack, so charging is fast, and it boasts built-in Wi-Fi, which seems basic these days given the ubiquitous nature of Wi-Fi devices, but as far as aviation portables are concerned, it’s a relatively recent advance. Tablets and smartphones didn’t kill the dedicated aviation GPS. Isabel lives and works out of Austin, Texas, and in her spare time she pretty much still thinks about airplanes. Not a member? Already a member? An accomplished air-to-air photographer as well, she has been working in aviation journalism for more than 25 years and led teams at several titles, including Sport Pilot and Flying, before coming to Plane & Pilot in 2015.

Also, the familiar “activate vectors to final” (VTF) command is gone, and that’s a mixed bag. Garmin recommends charging the unit for four hours before flight, but it took less time than that to fully charge the internal battery with the wall charger that came with it. I continue to carry the 660 for a spare and loan it to family members and friends from out of town. Yet the 760 is thinner, is lighter, uses less power, and has a higher-resolution screen with less reflectivity. And seemingly, like all of Garmin’s products these days, the 760 can be connected to compatible Garmin products, like navigators, though a serial or wireless connection, and it features the company’s Connext wireless transfer and data sharing capabilities. I have an Aera 660 on the yoke and will probably upgrade to the 760, in part because the 660 is already hardwired to a GDL 52R. I guess I should have invested that money somewhere else. The 760 is just a little smaller than a mini iPad and will sit far back in the yoke in portrait without blocking anything in my modified mount. Please login below for an enhanced experience. A common complaint among mid-Atlantic pilots, however, is that checking the dimensions of the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore Class B airspace is nearly impossible. – November 2020, Chit Chat Thread For The Week Of November 02, 2020.

There are customizable profile, weight-and-balance, and document pages. But you can answer just about every conceivable aviation question that comes up during an IFR or VFR flight, and that’s plenty. Garmin’s “Smart Airspace” feature can declutter the moving map and make relevant airspace more prominent as it gets nearer. The 760 isn’t as versatile as an iPad. As soon as I switched to an IFR chart, the airplane symbol on the georeferenced approach plate switched to high-contrast magenta. Garmin says the 760 can operate about 4.5 hours on battery power although screen brightness, cabin temperature, and other factors can extend or shorten battery life. By Isabel Goyer Updated April 29, 2020 Save Article. ©2020 Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Garmin aera 760: Looks and acts like a tablet, Books, film made to inspire future pilots. AOPA Pilot Editor at Large Dave Hirschman joined AOPA in 2008. Is there a way on the 760 to change the accuracy of the GPS? America’s owner-flown aircraft enthusiasts and active-pilot resource, delivered to your inbox! The routes are a big help to me. The aera 760 can even be connected to a compatible Garmin autopilot to drive VFR procedures, including vertical nav. I sent to Garmin and they sent me a unit that was noted as "newly overhauled". I should have stated brightness, as contrast is not adjustable. Btw, how do you adjust the contrast on the 760? The high-resolution screen shows the moving map in brilliant color and detail—especially in full screen. Looking at both units from any angle, The 660 offers sharper edges on the screen fonts and images, as well darker contrast while the 760 appears bluish-gray if not almost white. The aera® 760 is a premium all-in-one aviation portable complete with a built-in GPS/GLONASS receiver that is purpose-built for the pilot and cockpit.The aera 760 boasts a 7-inch bright, sunlight readable touchscreen display that can run on battery power for up to four hours on a single charge. That’s a potential lifesaver in haze, at night, during an inadvertent cloud encounter, or any other time pilots are at risk of spatial disorientation. It also can show TFRs when connected to an ADS-B receiver, and that’s a terrific backstop for VFR flying during an election year. All rights reserved. It’s a highly capable stand-alone GPS—but it gets much more powerful and clever when integrated with other Garmin equipment. The display, says Garmin, is very bright and easily dimmable to a low level. It’s much more rugged than an iPhone or an iPad, and it’s far less sensitive to heat, cold, and vibration—and the screen is less reflective in direct sunlight. My one complaint about the approach plates was that the white airplane symbol lacked contrast and blended into the white background. The screen seems great on the 760. Enter a flight plan and the terrain page will provide a color-coded map and profile view showing elevations along the way. But the pinch-zoom feature and high-resolution screen make even the smallest print readable. The Garmin aera 760 looks like an iPad Mini with only one button (power) and no knobs. Those features were invaluable on a recent transcontinental trip in a backcountry airplane. When connected via Bluetooth to a GDL ADS-B receiver with an air data attitude and heading reference system (ADAHRS), however, it can show an all-in-one attitude instrument (either full screen or split screen).

The screen on the 760 does not seem as clear. The latency on the 760 seems more. I think some of the hesitation has come with the 2009 map update and thought I saw a post that indicated that Garmin is working on a fix for that issue. Yet the 760 is thinner, is lighter, uses less power, and has a higher-resolution screen with less reflectivity. It’s similar in screen size, capability, and cost (about $1,500) to the aera 796. Loading and activating them is a bit different from other Garmin devices, however, because the “procedures” (PROC) key is absent from the 760. WAAS is not an option on the 700 series. I carry the 660 as a spare for just this type of event. Thanks. The Top 10 Planes Of All Time: WARNING: This List Goes To 11. When paired with SiriusXM Weather, the 760 can show cloud tops, freezing levels, lightning, and other advanced features. But with the $1,599 aera 760, Garmin might just have hit a sweet spot. When linked via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi to an ADS-B receiver, or Garmin panel-mount avionics, for example, the 760 can show weather, traffic, aircraft attitude, and other vital and timely information. So the question is, what can the aera 760 do that an iPad can’t? The 760 also seems useless charging with the USB or DC power cord. It comes with Garmin’s obstacle database and a detailed Terrain page, which is tremendously helpful in identifying potential routes through mountainous terrain. Later, I realized I had been navigating with a VFR moving map before loading the approach. Does it?

I use both in a convertible and find the 760 screen to be better and visible in full sun. But when linked to Wi-Fi in the FBO lobby, a quick glance at the map and weather pages shows current conditions across the entire country. How do these units compare?

Become a member and get exclusive access to articles, contests and more! You might try adjusting the brightness and contrast. There was on the 660. The 760 allows pilots to fly directly to any fix on the approach, and then it will auto-sequence all the way to the runway. And even though this one looks and acts like a smartphone or a tablet, it’s a much more reliable tool for flying than any mass-market consumer product could ever be. The 760 is a capable standalone navigator, and it gets even more powerful when linked to other Garmin avionics—particularly the GDL line of ADS-B receivers, which allow the 760 to show weather, traffic, and attitude information. I thought the same thing. You notice them when you try to use a different feature and fing that it is not on that model.

The 760 is much larger, brighter, and easier to manipulate than the company’s aera 660.

I know it does not come with the AC or carrying case. These include the company’s own Garmin Pilot app for the iPad and iPhone, as well as for Android devices.

Dave flies vintage, historical, and Experimental airplanes and specializes in tailwheel and aerobatic instruction.

The 760 comes with one free database update, and it took about one full hour to download it from the FlyGarmin website through the USB cable on a laptop. Yes, I know the blackboard predates the greenboard, the whiteboard and now the Smartboard, and I do too. Garmin aera 760 Portable Navigator Advertisement Garmin introduced today a new portable, and if you remember the good old days when a Garmin portable GPS unit was a revelation, then you know two other things—how far the company has come since then with such portable technology and how much less market there is for such devices with the advent of excellent all-in-one nav apps. Well, as you just read, a lot. From what I have read so far, WAAS is not used in the 700 series.

I also have both. It's just more difficult for me to spell anything with the letters in alphabetical order when you are used to using a keyboard; odd, but true. The 760 allows all sorts of aircraft symbols (low wing, high wing, multiengine, jet, helicopter), but all of them are white. I use both in a convertible and find the 760 screen to be better and visible in full sun.

I commonly fly with the VFR map on IFR trips because I like knowing about the topography below. The screen seems great on the 760. Aviation Breakthroughs Oddities/Milestones: Personal Jets, Huge Milestone: Piper Has FAA Certification For Autoland In M600, Autopsy Results For Pilot, Passengers In Kobe Bryant Crash. I have the 660 and i love it. There were other things that I had quickly become used to on the 760 that I didn't realize until going back to the 660 but I can't remember them all. Also available are terrain awareness, traffic (when connected to a compatible Garmin ADS-B receiver) including Garmin’s TargetTrend and TerminalTraffic utilities, and weather, both FIS-B and from SiriusXM, when paired with the appropriate receiver. It sure beats trying to direct them all over town. Looking at both units from any angle, The 660 offers sharper edges on the screen fonts and images, as well darker contrast while the 760 appears bluish-gray if not almost white. You might try adjusting the brightness and contrast.

The aera®760 is a portable aviation GPS with a sunlight-readable 7” touchscreen display and VFR/IFR route data. The 760 screen shows IFR arrival, approach, and departure procedures in just about the exact size as printed pages. After confirming repeatedly, it would just show "No Satellite Service", while my AT&T Tilt with Garmin XT would find satellites right away.