This name is of Norman French origin and means the ‘snub-nosed one’. It could be an occupational name for a person who cultivated goats. In old French, riviere means ‘river’ or ‘shore’. Will 5G Impact Our Cell Phone Plans (or Our Health?! This is a French variant of Jordan, which means ‘one who descends’. It is derived from the old German compound Aedelbeort meaning ‘noble-bright’. This is derived from the old French word sale which means ‘salty.’ This could be a topographic or occupational name for someone who lived by, or worked in a salt marsh. These are Baptista, Andree and Faw. This name is derived from the medieval Latin name vercaria, which means ‘farmland’. Originating from the French word bois meaning ‘forest’, the surname means ‘from the forest’. This is a variant of the word valencourt, which means a ‘low-lying farm’. Derived from the French word arsenal which means ‘workshop’, Arsenault is also an occupational surname for a gunmaker, a seller of guns, or the keeper of an arsenal. This is an occupational surname for baker. It is derived from the old French word blanchart, which means ‘whitish’ or ‘bordering upon white’.

The name is derived from the popular Norman given name William, which means ‘protection’ or ‘strength’. Also known as Le Cerf, this French surname means ‘hart’ or ‘deer’. This French surname is derived from the Latin word ‘benedictus’, which means ‘the one who says the good’. Genealogists use the presence of such first names in a family tree as further evidence of Romany Gypsy ancestry. It is derived from the old French name gagnon, which means ‘mastiff’ or a ‘guard dog’. This occupational surname derived from the word ferror, which refers to an iron worker. It is known to be derived from the Latin word vinacus, which is a derivative of vicus meaning ‘village’. This surname derived from coteau, which means a ‘small hill’. It could be an occupational surname for someone who traded in wool. This name is derived from the old French word grange, which means ‘granary’ or ‘barn’. Collin is derived from colle, which is ashort form of the Latin personal name Nicholaus that means ‘people’s victory’. This is a surname for a shoemaker or a cobbler. This is an occupational surname given to a person who plays or makes the violin. This French surname is derived from Basil, which in turn, is derived from ancient Greek name Basileios that means ‘royal’. This surname is derived from the French word chevre which means ‘goat’. 20000-names.com lists many other Romany/Gypsy surnames, including Petulengro, which is thought to come from the Romany term for a farrier, or horseshoe-maker; Boswell, a name derived from an old term for a settler; Grey, taken from the Sanskrit word for "horse"; Hearne/Herne, a name taken from heron and other types of birds; Lee; Lovel; Marshall; and Stanley. This surname means ‘of the court’. It could have also originated from from the words vert meaning ‘green’ and ville meaning ‘town’.

This is a topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary mark.

This surname, derived from the old French word veille, means ‘watch’ or ‘guard’. This surname was first found in Auvergne, a province in south France. The name Rue is derived from old French ruelle which means ‘lane’ or ‘alley’. This is a French occupational name for someone who sews clothes. This is derived from the name of a town. This is a geographical surname of people from Franche-Comte, a province in eastern France, and means ‘free country’. This French surname is an occupational surname for barber derived from old French name barbier. It is an occupational surname for corn merchant.

It is derived from the old French name gagnon, which means ‘mastiff’ or a ‘guard dog’.

Derived from old French word fontane meaning ‘well’ or ‘fountain’. It is derived from the word gwen, which means ‘light’ or ‘fair’. In old French, fevre means ‘craftsman’. This is derived from the French word fort which means ‘strong’. This occupational name derived from the keeper of the king’s forest. This could also be a topographic name which means an ‘area with plants’ or ‘shrubbery’. It is derived from the word escofia, which means ‘to dress’. Garnier: This name is derived from the old French word gerner or gernier, which means ‘storehouse for corn’ or ‘keeper of the granary’. It refers to someone ‘who sells or makes charcoal’. It could be a topographic name for someone living near a chestnut tree. This is a variant of the word Abreu, which means a ‘wise counselor’. Some common Romany Gypsy last names include Cooper, Smith, Lee, Boswell, Lovell, Doe, Wood, Young and Heron. This is an occupational surname for an ironsmith. Derived from old French cousture meaning ‘seam’, this could be an occupational name for a tailor. This is derived from the old French word voler, which means ‘to fly’ or ‘agile’. This name originated from the French word sauve meaning ‘safe’ and terre meaning ‘land’. Twin Baby Care: 16 Tips To Make The Task Easier, 30 Spiritual Boy Names That Are Full Of Positive Energy, 50 Exclusive Xitsonga Baby Names For Boys And Girls, 52 Glorious Baby Names That Mean Sun For Boys And Girls, 77 Traditional Ethiopian Baby Names With Meanings. This French surname is a derivative of barrer, which means ‘to bar’, ‘to close or block off’. This is a topographic name for someone who lived in a house by a boundary. In old French, the word roche means ‘rocky outcrop’. Or it may be related to the old French word rotier, routier meaning ‘highwayman’. This surname is derived from the word barbel, a type of fish. The last syllable, well, is the French ville: Boswell, Boston, and Busby all signify one and the same thing--the town of Bui--by the well being French, the Saxon, and by the Danish; they are half-brothers of Bovil ... LEE: The Gypsy name of this tribe is Purrum, sometimes pronounced Purrun. It could be a place or a field with a curve shape or a meandering river.

There could be two origins for this surname.It could have originated from the old French words roteor, roteeur, and routeer, which are used for a person who plays the rote. This is an occupational name for someone who carried a cross or bishop’s crook in religious processions. It could have also originated from the old French word soule, which means ‘platform’. Derived from an old French word bochier, which means ‘butcher’.