Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest.

The church and burial ground, which included the Grant family enclosure, was rebuilt, on an abandoned ancient site, at this time. A Pinetum was established on and adjacent to The Doune in the 19th century.

Formal landscape dating from the 17th/early 18th century, significantly informalised in the 19th century by parkland laid out in a picturesque design. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields. Although much of the wood was clear-felled in the 1830s, regeneration was good, as saplings regenerated 'as straight and thick as trees in a nursery' (Smout, 1997, p.116). Between 1769-71, wood sales reached £370 per annum compared with £175 from farm rentals on the estate. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot. Datum OSGB36 - NGR. The Doune, the Grant's mansion house, dates from the late 17th century. Information from RCAHMS (AKK and PM) 15 July 1996. Rothiemurchus : Dell, Dalnavert, Kinrara na Choille, Guislich, Achnahatnich, Tullochgrue.

Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation. The designed landscape extends along the east banks of the River Spey, to the west of its confluence with the Milton Burn.

From 1797 onwards, Sir John Peter Grant aggrandised the house and extended it eastwards to his own designs. In 1808 the farm steading, which had surrounded The Doune, was demolished and rebuilt to the north of Doune Hill leaving the grounds to be landscaped. The Doune dates from the late 17th century with various additions up to the mid 19th century. Single, off-centre piended dormer. Pre-booked visitors can enjoy the weekly guided visit to the partial ‘new’ Doune repair and completed old Doune as part of The Highland Lady Safari tour which meets at Rothiemurchus Centre every Wednesday and for groups by special arrangement.

Information from Mr P A Yeoman, 20 January 1992. Lat / long: 57.16532900, -3.84366450. © Copyright and database right 2020. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight. Remnants of the formal avenue survive and, in views from The Doune, serve to draw the eye south-east.

Patrick Grant 6th of Rothiemurchus known as ‘McAlpin was born in 1665 and in the late 17th he is said to have moved from the Dell of Rothiemurchus to the ‘fine house’ he built at the foot of the ‘Dun’, taking with him a carved armorial stone celebrating his great grandfather’s marriage in 1590 to Jean Gordon. Doune House is the traditional family home of the Grants of Rothiemurchus and forms part of the Rothiemurchus Estate.

Elizabeth Grant in ‘Memoirs of a Highland Lady’ describes how John Grant and/or his son Patrick repaired the ruins on Loch-an-Eilein in case of mishap, and destroyed the old fort of the Shaws on the Doune Hill, “leaving his malediction on any of his successors who should rebuild it.” The only evidence of the fort is the flat topped hill and the ditch or rampart. Grant's Memoirs written between 1845-54 offer an informative and vivid social history of the estate and its development from 1797 through to 1815.

which continued until 1821. It has been under the stewardship of the Grant family since the 16th Century and has a wealth of history before this. The principal block faces south and is five bays wide and two storeys high. Mansion of various builds between late 17th and mid 19th. Formal landscape dating from the 17th/early 18th century, significantly informalised in the 19th century by parkland laid out in a picturesque design.

whence Patrick Grant came. By the mid 18th century, The Doune had an entrance forecourt on its south-east front, leading to a formal tree-lined avenue aligned upon Ord Bàn. Regular single bay return E gable, with ground and 1st floor windows, each with long/short, rustication and keystoned lintel in ground floor. In 1877, the mansion house was again extended, being heightened to three storeys by the architect John Lessels. In 1848, Sir William Grant succeeded; he became Governor of Bengal from 1859-1862 and Governor of Jamaica 1866-1873. The West Lodge, situated 900m due south of The Doune, stands on the B970. The ‘new’ Doune house exterior restoration has returned the main front of the house to this period. The Doune dates from the late 17th century with various additions up to the mid 19th century. Muckerach Castle, some three miles from Grantown, and now in ruins, was the earliest seat of the Rothiemurchus family.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). Interior: some fine late 18th and early 19th century chimneypieces; remnants of late 18th century plaster friezes. 18th century estate surveys indicate a formal landscape laid out east of The Doune, including a grand formal avenue linking The Doune with Ord Bàn (Henderson, 1762; Tait, 1789). All rights reserved. The Doune of Rothiemurchus lies in Strathspey, 4km south of Aviemore and is accessed by the B970. In 1808 the farm steading, which had surrounded The Doune, was demolished and rebuilt to the north of Doune Hill leaving the grounds to be landscaped. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The fortification was […] The Doune of Rothiemurchus lies in Strathspey, 4km south of Aviemore and is accessed by the B970. We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate. It then divides; one branch leading north-westwards to Doune Farm and then through woodland north-west of The Doune. “A couple of good bedrooms above reached by a turning stair” were built to form a Georgian front to the house. The West Lodge (1805), remodelled by Elizabeth and Jane Grant in 1812, is a single storey white-harled cottage with projecting piended roof supported by brick pilasters forming a veranda. It was a very pretty cottage, particularly suited to the scenery...' (Grant 1898, p.322). You can visit the completed exterior and still to be completed restoration of The Doune House, Rothiemurchus: April to August every Monday 10.00 to 12.00 and 14.00 to 16.00 September to March on the first Monday of every month, 10.00 to 12.00 and 14.00 to 16.00 (except after dusk). It was subdivided into six compartments, with a 'Cornyard' attached to its north-east side (Henderson, 1762; Tait, 1789). By 1882, the estate contained 9,895ha (24,457 acres). The Doune provides an elevated vantage point in the valley, from which these views are appreciated. To rear at right angles, late 17th- early 18th century house, 3 storeys, 7 bays (of at least 2 builds and heightened to, full 3 storeys in mid 19th century); rubble, tooled ashlar. These are ruined and little else survives apart from the traces of some footpaths and a few fruit trees.

By 1803 further “great changes” had been made by his son, Sir John Peter Grant, the 9th Grant of Rothiemurchus, an English Barrister, Scottish Advocate and Whig M.P. The Shaw Clan continued to hold the site afterwards but eventually lost it to the Gordons in 1540 who then lost it to the Grant Clan in 1542. The estate woodlands are long-established and recorded from the 16th century. The northern contained an oval-shaped flower garden with formal beds. For the Doune House, 0.7 miles from the roundabout, turn … Just under 3 hours from Edinburgh on the A9. Panoramic mountain views are also intrinsic to Rothiemurchus. It provides a long sinuous approach through informal parkland to the house. The parkland lies south and east of The Doune along the low-lying flood plain. Elizabeth Grant noted 'my father had always had a turn for beautifying Rothiemurcus with cottages; it was more that, at first the effect of the picture in the scenery, than the wish to improve the dwellings of his people...' (Grant, 1898, p.321). Bing Maps | Google Maps | Historic maps (NLS) | OpenStreetMap | Ordnance Survey | PastMap | Streetmap | Wikimapia. Historic Environment Scotland does not accept any liability for any loss or damage suffered as a consequence of inaccuracies in the information provided. He extended the cottage in the cottage ornée style. A new walled garden was built c 1812 in the shelter of the: According to his daughter, the inconvenient form and arrangement of Sir John's early cottages, like the West Lodge, Boring Mill and The Polchar (c 1805), gave way to improved designs built as a result of his 'Searching through our drawing books for a model for the Croft... he now better understood the wants of a household.